Ettema lab blog

Standard and best practices for reporting genomes from metagenomes and single cells

Recently published in Nature Biotechnology Ettema-lab is part of an international cooperation to present two standards developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting bacterial and archaeal genome sequences. The standards are the Minimum Information about a Single Amplified Genome (MISAG) and the Minimum Information about a Metagenome-Assembled Genome (MIMAG), including, but not limited to,

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Science review: Genomic exploration of the diversity, ecology, and evolution of the archaeal domain of life

Ettema-lab is pleased to announce the recently published Science review ‘Genomic exploration of the diversity, ecology, and evolution of the archaeal domain of life’. Archaea are prokaryotes that make up a third branch of the tree of life. Knowledge of archaeal biological diversity and their role in evolution has rapidly expanded in the past decade. Despite the

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Just in time for summer: our new postdoc William Lewis

It’s time to announce William Lewis as the newest member of Ettema-lab! Will recently completed his PhD in Martin Embley’s lab (Newcastle University, UK) where he studied the evolution of hydrogenosomes (anaerobic mitochondria that make hydrogen) from several species of ciliates. Starting his first postdoc here in Ettema-lab his work will involve the exploration of poorly described archaeal lineages and

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Asgard archaea are the closest prokaryotic relatives of eukaryotes

Anja Spang*, Laura Eme*, Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Eva F. Caceres, Jimmy Saw, Jonathan Lombard, Lionel Guy and Thijs J. G. Ettema *Equal contribution

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SciLifeLab PhD Student Day – Jennah Dharamshi wins Best Poster Award!

Congratulations to our PhD student Jennah, who won the Best Poster Award (and 5000 SEK travel grant) at the SciLifeLab PhD Student Day with her Poster ‘Novel, diverse and abundant chlamydia discovered in Loki’s Castle deep marine sediments‘. Well done Jennah! /MS

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Fresh from the PNAS press: A new approach to rooting the archaeal tree of life

Now available in the Early Edition of PNAS: Tom Williams (University of Bristol, UK) in collaboration with, among others, the Ettema-lab reports on using integrative modeling of gene and genome evolution to root the archaeal tree of life and to resolve the metabolism of the earliest archaeal cells. This study sheds new light onto archaeal genome evolution,

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Ettema-lab has a new lab manager: Tom Martin

Tom Martin is joining the Ettema-lab as Lab Manager.  He will run the practical side of the lab, manage the LIMS system and work with many different projects in the Ettema group. Tom gained his PhD from SLU in Uppsala under Christina Dixelius working with plant defence against pathogens. He then did two post-docs at

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New paper published about evolution of microbial communities in subseafloor sediment

How are microbial communities assembled in the >5,000-y-old subsurface of marine sediment, and do they undergo adaptive evolution or accumulate mutations due to impaired DNA repair under such energy-limited conditions? This can be found out in the recent PNAS paper published by the Ettema-lab  in collaboration with Aarhus University and  MIT. To read the paper

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Another new face in the Ettema-lab: Jonathan Lombard

Jonathan is joining the Ettema-lab as a postdoc to study the enigmatic evolution of cell membranes at the prokaryotic-to-eukaryotic transition. His work focuses on the evolution of metabolism in the three domains of life, with particular emphasis on lipid biosynthesis and membrane-related functions. Jonathan obtained his PhD from the University Paris-Sud (France) under the supervision

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Ilja van Hoek joined the Ettema-lab

Ilja started her 2-year master Molecular Life Sciences with a specialization in bioinformatics in 2015 at the Radboud University (The Netherlands). Her first research internship was at the Comparative Genomics group of the Radboud University where she, under supervision of Martijn Huynen, made a computational tool that prioritizes genes based on human phenotypes. Ilja will do

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